Is MalwareBytes good for non tech savvy user?


vishalrao

Global Moral Police
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Please suggest some "user-friendly" (for my not much computer savvy senior citizen aunt) anti-virus / anti-malware software that helps things like avoid clicking malicious websites on MS Edge browser on Win10?

I dont want tech heavy stuff like Kaspersky etc... I'm thinking to purchase full version MalwareBytes, is that OK or any other suggestions?

somthing that does not throw up too many UI prompts unless warning about threats?
 

Sobirvs

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Mar 20, 2013
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User friendly?

Adblocker (for edge/chrome) with Windows 10 inbuilt security + notifications off (in chrome-site settings) + notifications off in windows 10 settings is the best setup ever. If you need more beautiful setup, do the same exact thing as I said before but don't install chrome as edge chromium with good settings+search engine with address bar search or just chrometana extension is good enough.

Run adwcleaner once a year and ccleaner once a year.

Stop wasting time, money and your computer resources for even a single 3rd party security , all of them are shit.
 
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arnabroy2306

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Malwarebyte premium is good for detecting malwares , it has dual modes for basic level and advanced level users ..so I dont think there would be any problem using it .
 
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m0h1t

drinks like a fish
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Sep 29, 2007
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Parents have no sense of what to click on and what not.

Been using eset internet security + Malwarebytes premium on all PCs and laptops at my parents + pihole on a pi for network level ads, malware, ransomware etc blocking for the last 2 years to make it as dummy proof as possible. Been working well so far.

Also make sure you turn on auto usb scan on all systems and put the firewall on auto mode.

I was luckily enough to buy a bunch of Malwarebytes licenses when they were still offering lifetime ones for like $10-15 a pop.

P.S. I've set eset and Malwarebytes to strict setting and to auto delete so my folks don't get all panicked and start calling me
 
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Julian

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I have a better (different) kind of idea if you can occasionally access that computer.

Make a drive image of a clean windows install with all necessary apps, settings etc. done. Make sure there is a separate partition, D: or whatever and move my documents etc to it. All their data/docs/media should be stored on the 2nd partition. And should the worst happen, a 5 minute image restore undoes every damage, even most ransomware. Unless it has encrypted documents on the 2nd partition of course.
 

Mr.J

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I have a better (different) kind of idea if you can occasionally access that computer.

Make a drive image of a clean windows install with all necessary apps, settings etc. done. Make sure there is a separate partition, D: or whatever and move my documents etc to it. All their data/docs/media should be stored on the 2nd partition. And should the worst happen, a 5 minute image restore undoes every damage, even most ransomware. Unless it has encrypted documents on the 2nd partition of course.
Best option would be to setup a sync to a cloud storage. So you'd get all the files back after reimage.
 
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