Which Batteries Can I Replace My Cordless AAA Batteries With?

sam9953

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Hi I have bought a new Panasonic Cordless phone and I was looking at the specifications of the AAA Ni-MH batteries and they are a min 630 mAh type. Now my question to all of you is that probably in the near future when my current supplied panasonic rechargeable batteries go kaput, will it be possible for me to buy batteries which have a higher capacity (say 2300 or 2500 mAh) and then use the same cordless charger for charging them? Will the charger be able to charge such batteries with higher capacity or do I need to buy similar batteries with almost the same charge capacity?

 

ivhere

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You could get AAA size battery of any capacity to replace this. All AAA batteries has specifications of 1.2Volt. Voltage is only thing which should be checked before replacing batteries.
 

sam9953

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You could get AAA size battery of any capacity to replace this. All AAA batteries has specifications of 1.2Volt. Voltage is only thing which should be checked before replacing batteries.
Oh okay. So incase I replace my batteries with rechargeable batteries of voltage 1.5v, that will not work right?
 

blr_p

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Now my question to all of you is that probably in the near future when my current supplied panasonic rechargeable batteries go kaput, will it be possible for me to buy batteries which have a higher capacity (say 2300 or 2500 mAh) and then use the same cordless charger for charging them? Will the charger be able to charge such batteries with higher capacity or do I need to buy similar batteries with almost the same charge capacity?
My AAA imedion rechargeables go up to 900mAh. You can't get 2k+ mAh in AAA size, only in AA size, this is why a cordless that takes AA is preferable. Though there are other form factors as well.

When you get rechargeables the phone should be able to charge them so long as its on the base station.

No need for eneloops as the phone will charge them anyway.
 
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sam9953

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My AAA imedion rechargeables go up to 900mAh. You can't get 2k+ mAh in AAA size, only in AA size, this is why a cordless that takes AA is preferable. Though there are other form factors as well.

When you get rechargeables the phone should be able to charge them so long as its on the base station.

No need for eneloops as the phone will charge them anyway.
Yeah I know that for me to buy a new set of batteries for the cordless, they have to be rechargeable. But my basic question was that should the capacity be identical to the ones which panasonic has supplied me or can it be more than the ones which they have supplied? Also, I do plan on buy eneloops as replacements.
 

Jambumali

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Voltage should be identical. Capacity can vary.
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eneloops - they are owned by Panasonic. Suggestion - don't buy those labeled Sanyo, maybe fakes/older stock.
 

blr_p

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But my basic question was that should the capacity be identical to the ones which panasonic has supplied me or can it be more than the ones which they have supplied?
Any capacity will work, charging will cut off when it reaches the designated level.

But you must replace the phone back on the base station for charging to occur. In general use this happens rarely and then battery dies more often than not.

Also, I do plan on buy eneloops as replacements.
Not necessary as a charger is included in the phone itself. It's a unique case here with your cordless :)

LSD's help when there is less use and no charger built in which in most other devices will be the case.
 

sam9953

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Voltage should be identical. Capacity can vary.
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eneloops - they are owned by Panasonic. Suggestion - don't buy those labeled Sanyo, maybe fakes/older stock.
I would be buying online, on the product images in websites like FK and Snapdeal I see that they are still showing the product images with "sanyo" written, I recently read that in 2013 all new eneloops had "panasonic eneloop" written instead of "sanyo enloop" is this true? or is it still "sanyo eneloop" for the Indian products. Please have a look at this link and tell me if they are selling the older eneloops: http://www.flipkart.com/sanyo-eneloop-hr-4utgb4btm-rechargeable-battery/p/itmdnfs5ga4jprdv?pid=ACCDNFRVW3VYBZ4N&cmpid=content_rechargeable-battery_8965229628_gmc_pla&tgi=sem,1,G,11214002,g,search,,41952306020,1o8,,,c,,,,,,,&gclid=Cj0KEQjwyMafBRCU7OCRyc2vitsBEiQAKV4H9LuoX2Y7Um6CwmEPFAQbdbAqSlRBRw9Hl4gd_lIjR1YaAkCf8P8HAQ
Any capacity will work, charging will cut off when it reaches the designated level.

But you must replace the phone back on the base station for charging to occur. In general use this happens rarely and then battery dies more often than not.
The cordless once it fully charges the battery, automatically cuts of the supply to the batteries, right? So what do you mean by "In general use this happens rarely and then battery dies more often than not." I could not understand that clearly.

Not necessary as a charger is included in the phone itself. It's a unique case here with your cordless :)

LSD's help when there is less use and no charger built in which in most other devices will be the case.
I just wanted to confirm, is buying eneloops as a replacement battery for my cordless the best idea or should I go for something else which is more optimized considering that I am going for a cordless replacement battery?
 
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blr_p

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The cordless once it fully charges the battery, automatically cuts of the supply to the batteries, right?
yes

So what do you mean by "In general use this happens rarely and then battery dies more often than not." I could not understand that clearly.
people are lazy and leave the phone where they last used it requiring the next person who want to make make a call hunt for the damn thing. It does not return to the base station as often, so does not get a recharge giving you less talk time. What this does is deep discarge the battery often in effect killing it sooner than otherwise.

I just wanted to confirm, is buying eneloops as a replacement battery for my cordless the best idea or should I go for something else which is more optimized considering that I am going for a cordless replacement battery?
Not a question of optimisation but unnecessary expense. LSD's retain charge longer than others and this is helpful in devices that get little use requiring less recharges on a dedicated charger. Less recharges means less stress means longer life over regular ones that can self discharge in three months just sitting in the drawer.

If eneloops have 20%+ more mAh than other nimh rechargeables you can source then go with eneloops but you're getting them because you cant find non-lsd's with equivalent capacity and not for lsd.
 
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sam9953

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Not a question of optimisation but unnecessary expense. LSD's retain charge longer than others and this is helpful in devices that get little use requiring less recharges on a dedicated charger. Less recharges means less stress means longer life over regular ones that can self discharge in three months just sitting in the drawer.

If eneloops have 20%+ more mAh than other nimh rechargeables you can source then go with eneloops but you're getting them because you cant find non-lsd's with equivalent capacity and not for lsd.
Much of what you have said to me is clear to me, but I would like to ask you, what would you recommend as a better replacement for cordless batteries: 600 mAh eneloop batteries with 2000 maximum recharges of 800 mAh eneloop batteries with maximum 1800 recharges? Which ones would suit me more?
 
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Jambumali

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Panasonic Eneloops make more sense than Sanyo Eneloops.

What I do remember, when I looked around last time around, was that the higher capacity eneloops had almost half the recharges of the lower cap ones. Since the 1800 recharges with 800mAh is not so bad compared with 2000, go for the higher capacity (800) ones.
 

ankushv

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To keep things simple here I had a Panasonic cordless from flipkart . It was a year old and the battery started failing . I bought Sony batteries a a a size from flipkart (ws retail) . The batteries are sill good today after a year . They are almost the same mah as the stock ones of Panasonic as I did not need to use them for high current devices . I'm happy a year later too . Batteries bought locally are mostly fake. Have had bad experiences with a a and aaa batteries being fake before .
 

blr_p

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If there isn't an import sticker then its fake.

Fakes use nicds and are disguised to look as high capacity Nimhs. A nicd in a cordless is the worst combo you can get as there is no way to run it down completely before recharging. So constant recharges will kill them quickly due to memory effect.
 

blr_p

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better in what way ? the main purpose of lsd isn't necessary for this application.

Could not find AAA panasonic eneloops only AA.

Non LSD's come with a higher capacity than lsd and are cheaper. Higher capacity means longer operating life and battery life. Though i suppose the charging circuit in the phone will be basic so will take its toll over time.

All depends on whether you can source genuine products and they must have a recent manufacturing date say less than a year.
 

sam9953

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better in what way ? the main purpose of lsd isn't necessary for this application.

Could not find AAA panasonic eneloops only AA.

Non LSD's come with a higher capacity than lsd and are cheaper. Higher capacity means longer operating life and battery life. Though i suppose the charging circuit in the phone will be basic so will take its toll over time.

All depends on whether you can source genuine products and they must have a recent manufacturing date say less than a year.
Now I get it. Thanks a lot for your help.
 

blr_p

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see the price and only 500 mah for an application that does not require them.
 

a_t_u_l

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The phone charger which is meant to charge 600 mah will take 4 times to charge 2000 mah and may fail to charge as it is not meant for it. This has been personally tested. The best I have used with ease is 1000 mah.