Corsair offering inferior PSU as a replacement

Time to lagega in both scenarios.

Yaar, yehi advice follow karta hota to pata nahi kya kya le chuka hota kahan kahan par. For mods: Cannot convey this in English.
Good luck bhai.
About the second like I am not sure where or what scenarios like this you have been in the past. But corsair will refund on pro rata basis. For how much did you buy it? And please share the refund amount that they are offering you.
 
Good luck bhai.
About the second like I am not sure where or what scenarios like this you have been in the past. But corsair will refund on pro rata basis. For how much did you buy it? And please share the refund amount that they are offering you.
~16k. What do you think they will offer as a refund? They haven't told me the refund amount yet. They are asking me to wait till15th may to confirm the refund amount.
 
PrimeABGB can import on request, it takes two to four weeks. Non-import pricing for that model is a little over 40k.
I had enquired with them and asked if they can arrange that for me through a backorder etc. but they refused saying no availability. Do you know how I can go about raising an import request with them?
Alternatively, Amazon US would be able to get it to you for ~65k.
That price is just stupid. Talking to various retailers, it seems 1600i won't be available for at least 2 months in India. What are your thoughts about Antec Signature Series SP1300? This looks ok for my requirements, obviously not an ideal choice but I think it should be able to handle power spike from an oced overvolted 6900XT.
 

Chaos

Skilled
I had enquired with them and asked if they can arrange that for me through a backorder etc. but they refused saying no availability. Do you know how I can go about raising an import request with them?

That price is just stupid. Talking to various retailers, it seems 1600i won't be available for at least 2 months in India. What are your thoughts about Antec Signature Series SP1300? This looks ok for my requirements, obviously not an ideal choice but I think it should be able to handle power spike from an oced overvolted 6900XT.
Running a 3090 with the signature 1000. You don't need 1300 for a 6900XT. It consumes far less power.
 
Running a 3090 with the signature 1000. You don't need 1300 for a 6900XT. It consumes far less power.
Go through the thread once. I am Oceing my 6900 XT to the max, sometimes up to 500W using MPT. Then their is a question of power spikes, even an average 6900XT can go up-to !~600W for short periods of times (link). I am not even considering 12700KF, NVme SSD and OCed Ram in that equation. So yeah, I absolutely need more than 1000W for comfortable operation of my system
 

Chaos

Skilled
Go through the thread once. I am Oceing my 6900 XT to the max, sometimes up to 500W using MPT. Then their is a question of power spikes, even an average 6900XT can go up-to !~600W for short periods of times (link). I am not even considering 12700KF, NVme SSD and OCed Ram in that equation. So yeah, I absolutely need more than 1000W for comfortable operation of my system
You will still be below 1kW. 6900 XT even in crazy oc state will consume less than a reasonably oc'ed 3090(~2GHz boost clocks) like mine. The AMD cards this gen are rather tame this present gen. I have an Rx 6800 in my secondary rig and it doesn't even get hot at 2.5-2.6 GHz boost clocks. In comparison the 3090 is a furnace.

There might be issues only if you stay in a very hot place and don't have air-conditioning.
 

rsaeon

Adept
You will still be below 1kW.

I thought so as well, but the 6900XT can spike to over 600W for a few milliseconds: https://www.techpowerup.com/review/gigabyte-radeon-rx-6900-xt-gaming-oc/35.html

Coupled with the 12700K's 374W draw at a 5GHz overclock, that's about a 1000W peak load between the CPU and GPU before adding any other components.

Infact, this may be the reason why his 1000W failed prematurely, it can only reliably supply about 10% over the rated output.
 
You will still be below 1kW. 6900 XT even in crazy oc state will consume less than a reasonably oc'ed 3090(~2GHz boost clocks) like mine. The AMD cards this gen are rather tame this present gen. I have an Rx 6800 in my secondary rig and it doesn't even get hot at 2.5-2.6 GHz boost clocks. In comparison the 3090 is a furnace.
Technically, maybe, but then that does mean not running the system comfortably, does it. I just saw a post with 6900XT requiring 600W (refer screenshot below) alone for a TS high score run. Also, one can't just ignore those 600W plus spikes and that's just for a normal RX6900XT.

To give a ball park estimate of a high load scenario:

6900XT [decent OC] : ~600W [550 for Chip + Components]
12700KF [Default] : ~220W
Add to that OCed rams, multiple m.2 SSDs including a fast NVME, fans and other small components and you start reaching the limits of a 1000 w PSU.

1651398510310.png

There might be issues only if you stay in a very hot place and don't have air-conditioning.
That description fits my situation more or less.
 
It's not in the same class as the AX series but it is a solid alternative, able to peak at 1800W. Personally, for a 25% more I'd prefer the Asus ROG 1200W that has an OLED display.
Thanks for the input. I already placed an order for it few hours ago. About, ROG 1200, I wouldn't pick it over SP1300. It's 100w less, has display with very limited functionality which I won't be able to use due to the PSU shroud on my case (true for most cases these days) and it also costs ~25% more and at that point one should just go for an AX1600i.
 

Chaos

Skilled
It's not in the same class as the AX series but it is a solid alternative, able to peak at 1800W. Personally, for a 25% more I'd prefer the Asus ROG 1200W that has an OLED display.
Both are basically the same seasonic platform with 99% same parts. The vanilla AX series is also seasonic. The Asus Rog and Thor are also seasonic.
I thought so as well, but the 6900XT can spike to over 600W for a few milliseconds: https://www.techpowerup.com/review/gigabyte-radeon-rx-6900-xt-gaming-oc/35.html

Coupled with the 12700K's 374W draw at a 5GHz overclock, that's about a 1000W peak load between the CPU and GPU before adding any other components.

Infact, this may be the reason why his 1000W failed prematurely, it can only reliably supply about 10% over the rated output.
Most well built power supplies can easily handle 30% over rated transients without shutting down. OCP on most PSUs built on the latest seasonic platform is around 135% of rated power. Check gamersnexus for psu tests.
 

Skynet

Disciple
Technically, maybe, but then that does mean not running the system comfortably, does it. I just saw a post with 6900XT requiring 600W (refer screenshot below) alone for a TS high score run. Also, one can't just ignore those 600W plus spikes and that's just for a normal RX6900XT.

To give a ball park estimate of a high load scenario:

6900XT [decent OC] : ~600W [550 for Chip + Components]
12700KF [Default] : ~220W
Add to that OCed rams, multiple m.2 SSDs including a fast NVME, fans and other small components and you start reaching the limits of a 1000 w PSU.

View attachment 133084

That description fits my situation more or less.
I am using a fully OCed 3090 and a Quadro in a single system with a threadripper cpu with a 1200 watt PSU.

The system runs 24*7 with rock solid stability never had any random BSODs.

Nvme and RAM literally consumes few watts at best you're really exaggerating the power use in your head.

You can use cooler master power calculator tool to asses you're exact power usage it's a very accurate tool.

Almost all PSUs are manufactured by the twin oligopoly of great wall and seasonic Corsair is nothing but rebranded great wall psu they don't manufacture anything.

Instead of focusing on large power figure(weird thing to obsess about) focus on 12v rating of the PSU ie how much it can provide on the 12v rail that is the crucial metric wrt to running power hungry GPUs.

Also with such high usage focus on getting a titanium rating, you will be better served by a lower wattage titanium rating PSU than a high wattage platinum PSU.
Hi Guys,

I have sent an RM1000i PSU for RMA to Corsair and they want me to accept an RM1000x PSU as a replacement which is an inferior product in many respects (list below). There excuses are "the replacement Model RM1000i is not in stock and is EOL." What are my options here ?

1. RM1000x is missing a higher quality FDB fan.
2. The RMx doesn't have the test fan button.
3. The RMi is a multi-rail unit by default - switchable to single rail via Link. The RMx is simply a single rail PSU. [not sure about this one]
4. RMx does not have software monitoring (very important to me)
I also faced exactly similar situation to yours , I also had a HXi power supply that I had RMAed but they were giving me a HX series product and had to pester them for few weeks with constant emails , technical descriptions and economics 101.

They finally relented to give me a AX series as replacement , I wanted a AXi but that would have been too much I guess and AX was good enough, personally speaking I never used power monitoring feature , nor I was attached to it , but felt a little cheated idk so just pestered them for the heck of it , didn't really care about the exact model in hindsight the HX series would have been good too.

Also it doesn't occur to us but PSU design also improves a lot with each generation albeit a little more slowly compared to CPUs and GPUs newer PSUs also have better design, better caps, better current modulation compared to older models regardless of same efficiency rating.

So get anything above 1000 watt from a good brand, I personally recommend seasonic they are the OG and spend the extra dough on something else, and if they low ball you on refund then just get the PSU from them.

Also in my many emails to them they also agreed to give me a higher tier model provided I pay the difference so maybe work on that angle of you're dead set on the AX1600i and it's haunting in you dreams
 
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I am using a fully OCed 3090 and a Quadro in a single system with a threadripper cpu with a 1200 watt PSU. The system runs 24*7 with rock solid stability never had any random BSODs.
I think you didn't read the posts carefully. A fully OCed 3090 will never reach 600-650w alone unless you are doing bios moding on it. Of course your system will run fine with a 1200W power supply in that case.
Nvme and RAM literally consumes few watts at best you're really exaggerating the power use in your head.
Power consumption number reported by my PSU(when I had the RM1000i) and UPS are not in my head. System consumes around ~125W of power during browsing. Only around 30-40 watts are for the CPU and GPU combined.
You can use cooler master power calculator tool to asses you're exact power usage it's a very accurate tool.

Almost all PSUs are manufactured by the twin oligopoly of great wall and seasonic Corsair is nothing but rebranded great wall psu they don't manufacture anything.
Those tools do not account for component consuming twice their rated power. Also, its common thing that a brand selling a PSU is not usually the manufacturer. This not a revelation for anyone following tech in some depth. But there are instances wherein software monitoring and other features are added and introduced based on the brand. Then their are special cases like 1600i.
Instead of focusing on large power figure(weird thing to obsess about) focus on 12v rating of the PSU ie how much it can provide on the 12v rail that is the crucial metric wrt to running power hungry GPUs.

Also with such high usage focus on getting a titanium rating, you will be better served by a lower wattage titanium rating PSU than a high wattage platinum PSU.
I think you are confusing a genuine need with an obsession of some kind. Not sure why or how you came to that conclusion. If I only wanted more power in a PSU, I would have purchased a cooler master
M2000 and be done with it. A titanium PSU won't help me if I am exceeding the power requirements of that PSU. It might be able to deliver power over rated capacity for some time but that is not a proper operation/use of PSU.

I also faced exactly similar situation to yours , I also had a HXi power supply that I had RMAed but they were giving me a HX series product and had to pester them for few weeks with constant emails , technical descriptions and economics 101.

They finally relented to give me a AX series as replacement , I wanted a AXi but that would have been too much I guess and AX was good enough, personally speaking I never used power monitoring feature , nor I was attached to it , but felt a little cheated idk so just pestered them for the heck of it , didn't really care about the exact model in hindsight the HX series would have been good too.

Also it doesn't occur to us but PSU design also improves a lot with each generation albeit a little more slowly compared to CPUs and GPUs newer PSUs also have better design, better caps, better current modulation compared to older models regardless of same efficiency rating.

So get anything above 1000 watt from a good brand, I personally recommend seasonic they are the OG and spend the extra dough on something else, and if they low ball you on refund then just get the PSU from them.

Also in my many emails to them they also agreed to give me a higher tier model provided I pay the difference so maybe work on that angle of you're dead set on the AX1600i and it's haunting in you dreams
Thanks for sharing you RMA experience. I am still waiting for their reply regarding refund amount. FYI, I don't suffer nightmares/hauntings from computer components, and if did have dream about AX1600i , it would probably be a daydream not a nightmare.
Will selling a sealed replacement give you more than the refund amount?
No
 

Skynet

Disciple
I think you didn't read the posts carefully. A fully OCed 3090 will never reach 600-650w alone unless you are doing bios moding on it. Of course your system will run fine with a 1200W power supply in that case.
I am also using a Quadro along with a threadripper , they also consume close to 600 watts plus 8 sticks of ram and multiple nvme SSDs


I am literally close to or exceeding my rated limit of 1200 watts, the PSU has been working fine for almost 2 years now.

I can understand your concern regarding the abnormal behaviour of ampere and the momentary power spikes , but what I want to say is most quality PSUs are rated for far more current than their rated capacity , it's called built in buffer or redundancy so you should be fine.

Ofcourse you should not run it above it's rated capacity but momentary spikes here and there is A-okay.

However I would say Lovelace is going to be another power hungry demon so I'm guessing going for a bigger PSU will leave you enough head room for a upgrade.

But then anything above 1000 watt will have bad performance at idle power draw scenarios, basically bigger the power supply worse it will be at idle/low power draws , PSUs tend to hit their efficiency sweet spot at 50-80% power draw.

So a 1600 watt will definitely suffer there that's why i advised for a lower wattage but a higher efficiency PSU.

Unless you really don't care about efficiency and electricity costs then it's a non issue. :/

Those tools do not account for component consuming twice their rated power.
They do however account for higher power draw and will give a good enough base line , also there is a option for GPU and CPU overclock to be factored in so it's pretty much close enough.
If I only wanted more power in a PSU, I would have purchased a cooler master
M2000 and be done with it. A titanium PSU won't help me if I am exceeding the power requirements of that PSU. It might be able to deliver power over rated capacity for some time but that is not a proper operation/use of PSU.
You won't be exceeding more than 1000 watts including the much feared momentary power spikes so obviously 2000 watt is pretty much useless so is 1600 watts too, also they would be that much worse at idle usage assuming you don't run your machine 24*7 like me running ML workloads.

You will be better off getting a 1000 watts or a 1200 watts titanium(will give headroom for upgrade since Lovelace is confirmed to have 600 watt power draw)

I think you're over doing your PSU which feels like a typical PC gamer d**k measuring contest to be honest.(have been a part of that myself as well) so can't blame you.
 
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I am also using a Quadro along with a threadripper , they also consume close to 600 watts plus 8 sticks of ram and multiple nvme SSDs


I am literally close to or exceeding my rated limit of 1200 watts, the PSU has been working fine for almost 2 years now.
You just said earlier that Nvme and RAM literally consumes few watts and you were right. The thing is, all these things add up and if you are about to reach the limit of your PSU, they can become the determining factor for power consumption exceeding PSU limits .
I can understand your concern regarding the abnormal behaviour of ampere and the momentary power spikes , but what I want to say is most quality PSUs are rated for far more current than their rated capacity , it's called built in buffer or redundancy so you should be fine.

Ofcourse you should not run it above it's rated capacity but momentary spikes here and there is A-okay.

However I would say Lovelace is going to be another power hungry demon so I'm guessing going for a bigger PSU will leave you enough head room for a upgrade.
It's actually RDNA2 and those power spikes of 600W are for a default non oc RX 6900xt.
But then anything above 1000 watt will have bad performance at idle power draw scenarios, basically bigger the power supply worse it will be at idle/low power draws , PSUs tend to hit their efficiency sweet spot at 50-80% power draw.

So a 1600 watt will definitely suffer there that's why i advised for a lower wattage but a higher efficiency PSU.

Unless you really don't care about efficiency and electricity costs then it's a non issue. :/
I will take some efficiency loss for peace of mind.
A 1000 watt titanium would be sweet for your use case imho

They do however account for higher power draw and will give a good enough base line , also there is a option for GPU and CPU overclock to be factored in so it's pretty much close enough.

You won't be exceeding more than 1000 watts including the much feared momentary power spikes so obviously 2000 watt is pretty much useless , so is 1600 watts too also they would be that much worse at idle usage assuming you don't run your machine 24*7 like running ML workloads.

You will be better off getting a 1000 watts or a 1200 watts(will give headroom for upgrade since Lovelace is confirmed to have 600 watt power draw)

I think you're over doing your PSU which feels like a typical PC gamer dick measuring contest to be honest.(have been a part of that myself as well).
I don't know how buying an ANTEC 1300 can be classified as dick measuring contest. While not a run of the mill PSU, there are many options with better quality, features and wattage above it.

With my RM1000i, I had to spent around ~2 weeks to diagnose the actual issue. First I though it was my GPU oc, then just my GPU at default causing issue, then I though it might have to do with my UPS or the PSU cables or some other stuff. The PSU would work fine on idle or with some games or with OCCT sometimes but would crash during other runs. I just don't want to deal with this stuff anymore and if I have to have a PSU with few 100 watts more for that, then that's what I am going to get. And, I know those things can happen with Antec sp1300 as well but at least I won't have doubts about power consumption reaching the limits of the PSU.
 
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rsaeon

Adept
Both are basically the same seasonic platform with 99% same parts. The vanilla AX series is also seasonic. The Asus Rog and Thor are also seasonic.

This is true. But there are variations between them that's enough of a differentiating factor to choose one over the other like aesthetics, noise.

Most well built power supplies can easily handle 30% over rated transients without shutting down. OCP on most PSUs built on the latest seasonic platform is around 135% of rated power.

Also true, the % varies between the different models even from the same oem for example it's 35% for the Antec and 42% for the Asus.

Check gamersnexus for psu tests.

I find myself preferring the reviews at Tom's Hardware, they're very intellectually stimulating. Tom's Hardware faced several reputation changes over the last couple of decades, but their PSU reviews these days are done by Aris Mpitziopoulos who in part helped redefine PSU testing to be more granular taking in consideration efficiency and noise with the Cybernetics Certification https://www.cybenetics.com/index.php
 
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