Recover data from hardisk

vivek90a

Disciple
Hi Members

Would like to know, if anyone has a better way to recover data from hardisk that is not detected in OS.

Hardware recovery solutions are asking like 15K++, looking for DIY solution.
 

nRiTeCh

Skilled
Hi Members

Would like to know, if anyone has a better way to recover data from hardisk that is not detected in OS.

Hardware recovery solutions are asking like 15K++, looking for DIY solution.
If its not detecting in OS then tough luck. Bt is it external or internal.
If internal then try booting from Hiren boot iso.
 

vivek90a

Disciple
If its not detecting in OS then tough luck. Bt is it external or internal.
If internal then try booting from Hiren boot iso.
Its external but tried using internally after damage still same issue.
Thanks for the reply guys.
 
Last edited:

diy-maniac

Disciple
Does it atleast show up the Disk Management? Some times they lose the partition info, and it makes the drive invisible.
You can try TestDisk utility. Do check on youtube about how/what it is to decide if worth a try.

Also consider adding little more details to the context like if the system recognizes with a sound that a device is plugged in. If the system not reconize at all, then no amount of software can fix. It is mostly a failure on hardware.
 

kiran6680

Disciple
It will depend on which part of the hard drive has gone faulty.

1. If connectors (power or sata) have gone bad or loose : careful soldering or "holding" the connector in place with the cable by one person while the other recovers data should work.

You can check this by carefully moving the connectors and checking if they are momentarily detected. Also, does it make spinning noises/vibrations when connected? OS logs should come handy rather than waiting for explorer to show the drive : journalctl command in Linux would show a momentarily detected drive. There may be some equivalent in windows too.

2. If the controller has gone bad, you are in luck only if it is a very old hard drive. You can swap out the controller of another hard disk, and attach to the failed one.

3. If platters have gone bad, it is practically impossible for most professional data recovery people who charge less than crores.

After the hardware trickery, it will depend on the state in which your hard drive is detected. If it was encrypted (e.g. using bitlocker), you'll need to decrypt it. If files are not visible or filesystem is corrupt : photorec software ( or other freely available recovery software) should work.
 

vivek90a

Disciple
Does it atleast show up the Disk Management? Some times they lose the partition info, and it makes the drive invisible.
You can try TestDisk utility. Do check on youtube about how/what it is to decide if worth a try.

Also consider adding little more details to the context like if the system recognizes with a sound that a device is plugged in. If the system not reconize at all, then no amount of software can fix. It is mostly a failure on hardware.

Nooo, checked all over the internet. Asked here if anyone has DIY solution. BTW thanks.


Bro... it isnt shwoing in system... isnt going to work. Thanks

It will depend on which part of the hard drive has gone faulty.

1. If connectors (power or sata) have gone bad or loose : careful soldering or "holding" the connector in place with the cable by one person while the other recovers data should work.

You can check this by carefully moving the connectors and checking if they are momentarily detected. Also, does it make spinning noises/vibrations when connected? OS logs should come handy rather than waiting for explorer to show the drive : journalctl command in Linux would show a momentarily detected drive. There may be some equivalent in windows too.

2. If the controller has gone bad, you are in luck only if it is a very old hard drive. You can swap out the controller of another hard disk, and attach to the failed one.

3. If platters have gone bad, it is practically impossible for most professional data recovery people who charge less than crores.

After the hardware trickery, it will depend on the state in which your hard drive is detected. If it was encrypted (e.g. using bitlocker), you'll need to decrypt it. If files are not visible or filesystem is corrupt : photorec software ( or other freely available recovery software) should work.

Yes gone through all that and my research leads to the head being damaged. But even if we can replace controller still need same working board. right?
 

kiran6680

Disciple
Yes gone through all that and my research leads to the head being damaged. But even if we can replace controller still need same working board. right?
Yes, head damage is weird, never came across such a case.
What is the hard disk model ? When was it manufactured. If in last 7 years or so, even same model's controller won't work. Otherwise yes, it used to need same model, though we used to be able to research if a similar model's controller will also work.

But these days, hard disks have a map of block remapping which is dynamic and specific to a hard disk, even an identical controller doesn't work.
 

Kratos47

Disciple
There's no way of recovering data if there's any sort of mechanical failure. Only way is to get it to a professional lab where they will pull it apart and use the platters on new parts and this service is usually not cheap since it's done in a vacuum dust free environment.
 

nRiTeCh

Skilled
My kind words since few yrs and even today to everyone out there: Keep your utmost important data either on cloud or maintain multiple offline backups scattered across external cum internal drives.
I haven't bought any external drives ever nor I trust them given their sudden death and then no cheap/hassle free diy unlike internals.
 

D C

Adept
Use 3-2-1 backup strategy, at least for your most critical data. May not be possible/too expensive for all your data.


 

vivek90a

Disciple
Yes, head damage is weird, never came across such a case.
What is the hard disk model ? When was it manufactured. If in last 7 years or so, even same model's controller won't work. Otherwise yes, it used to need same model, though we used to be able to research if a similar model's controller will also work.

But these days, hard disks have a map of block remapping which is dynamic and specific to a hard disk, even an identical controller doesn't work.
Yes, not 100%. When i checked with professional backup service there way of backup is to look for identical drive and replace the circular plate.

There's no way of recovering data if there's any sort of mechanical failure. Only way is to get it to a professional lab where they will pull it apart and use the platters on new parts and this service is usually not cheap since it's done in a vacuum dust free environment.
Have seen few videos in youtube, they were working in dust free environment but not vacuum.

My kind words since few yrs and even today to everyone out there: Keep your utmost important data either on cloud or maintain multiple offline backups scattered across external cum internal drives.
I haven't bought any external drives ever nor I trust them given their sudden death and then no cheap/hassle free diy unlike internals.
yeah man, sometimes things aren't in our control to avoid a disaster.

Use 3-2-1 backup strategy, at least for your most critical data. May not be possible/too expensive for all your data.


Thanks man, usually I thoroughly search google for any purpose. Since we are judgadu may be few of us know trick which few of us doesn't.

Is it detected in BIOS?
If its connected system wont even post to bios.
 

Mr.J

Skilled
If its connected system wont even post to bios.
Can you try this: Make a bootable pendrive with a Linux distro. I'd recommend Mint. Use Rufus for creating bootable pendrive.

Make USB first boot device. Connect faulty drive and pendrive to system. Start the system and try to enter BIOS.
 

vivek90a

Disciple
Can you try this: Make a bootable pendrive with a Linux distro. I'd recommend Mint. Use Rufus for creating bootable pendrive.

Make USB first boot device. Connect faulty drive and pendrive to system. Start the system and try to enter BIOS.
Yeah, it just revolves stops and again revolves and system becomes unresponsive.
 

Kratos47

Disciple
You can't DIY. However it's relatively easy for a technician to replace it from a scrap drive he may have.
If there was no physical damage like from a strong vibration while running or a drop then most likely the PCB has gone kaput, which also can be replaced.
Truth can only be revealed after opening it. Also bear in mind warranty will be voided once it's opened.
 
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