We may no longer need to buy expensive hardware to play games - Google Stadia


Marcus Fenix

Well-Known Member
Veteran
I am still not sure how it will be possible in some games like for example heavy single player one like doom eternal or mortal kombat or crysis, do they want to say that they will do all the rendering on their side like all that RTX lights and you need only browser?
All the processing will be done on the server side and you will be in effect running an interactive streaming video only.

The major issue here would be input lag due to the ping times from your PC to the Stadia server.

The latencies of even first world internet is not upto the task so forget us for the next 10 years.
 

Chaos

Well-Known Member
Veteran
All the processing will be done on the server side and you will be in effect running an interactive streaming video only.

The major issue here would be input lag due to the ping times from your PC to the Stadia server.

The latencies of even first world internet is not upto the task so forget us for the next 10 years.

I work in this space. While Google's attempt so far has been sub par, it isn't as simple as that.

Yes you are effectively playing back the video stream but you can do very sophisticated prediction of the game state based on latency.

Prediction also exists in standard multiplayer games since the days of Quake World as without prediction, it is impossible to run the game state of a multiplayer shooter.

In addition, you can always over-render and then apply some warping at the client end to match the current view based on current input.

While this may or may not update the dynamic objects in the scene depending upon how the technique is utilized, it gets rid of a substantial amount of lag.

Stadia is only the tip of the iceberg and its biggest issue is having to buy games on that platform. This is something NVIDIA's service eliminates it completely as it allows you to use your steam library.

On a more personal level - We are working on splitting the rendering load altogether using something called Object Space Rendering. We are tackling the VR issue as this is even more latency sensitive.

If VR works fine, normal games are a piece of cake. This approach can tolerate lag of upto 100-120ms with no obvious effects. Video here:

 

Engineer.AI

New Member
Disciple
Google through Stadia, and Nvidea through Shadow - are merely prototypes in the long way ahead for Cloud Gaming, in general. While each of them have their pros and cons, they're subject to a vast margin of improvement. The downside to Stadia, is the lack of quality titles attached to the product. I would rather argue, that since clients like FIGHTCADE, have been leting you basically play remotely all this time, Google has no business monopolizing this groundbreaking achievement (I know that it isn't, especially not with THAT hardware; But back of our minds, we know how realistically possible this is).
~Engineer.AI
 

rabid.parrots

Member
Disciple
this tech still has a LOOOONG way to go.

lets take Destiny 2.

it runs like diarrhea on Stadia. its just barely playable on Nvidia's offering, but its held back by high ping and general performance issues.

we're not going to replace our desktops in this decade.

besides, i dont like this new tech. i want to own my hardware and games, not rent it ffs.
 

Engineer.AI

New Member
Disciple
this tech still has a LOOOONG way to go.

lets take Destiny 2.

it runs like diarrhea on Stadia. its just barely playable on Nvidia's offering, but its held back by high ping and general performance issues.

we're not going to replace our desktops in this decade.

besides, i dont like this new tech. i want to own my hardware and games, not rent it ffs.

Really valid points, man. I too dont like to rent my games. Stadia and Shadow do offer something unique on the market - they however, have a long way to go with it.
~Vibhor Tyagi (Techie at Engineer.AI)
 

Marcus Fenix

Well-Known Member
Veteran
Really valid points, man. I too dont like to rent my games. Stadia and Shadow do offer something unique on the market - they however, have a long way to go with it.
~Vibhor Tyagi (Techie at Engineer.AI)

I am a bit confused by the way you write keeping in mind your other posts. Gramatically its correct but the wording seems a bit off which would maybe need a proper Turing test to resolve.

Are you really human or an AI bot?
 

rabid.parrots

Member
Disciple
I am a bit confused by the way you write keeping in mind your other posts. Gramatically its correct but the wording seems a bit off which would maybe need a proper Turing test to resolve.

Are you really human or an AI bot?
uncanny valley.
might be a bot.

but still, until proven otherwise, we'll assume its a person.
 

Engineer.AI

New Member
Disciple
lmao sorry, english isnt my first language. Now that I look back on the comment, I see the weird syntax lol!

My point was that although flawed, Stadia and Shadow DO offer a fresh take on the gaming market...one that can be made an industry standard, if given proper resources.
 

tech.monk

Well-Known Member
Disciple
I would like to add one more viewpoint to this discussion - if anyone has seen how computer vision, machine learning abilities are improving.

Especially how Big4 in tech and Nvidia/AMD take it up in the next 2 years - this entire tech will be revolutionary.

Also, I would like to agree on the point that adding VR to this equation will be an awesome thing to have and how MS Hololens take the mixed reality will add one more dimension to this space.
 

Soyab0007

Gamer
Adept
this tech still has a LOOOONG way to go.

lets take Destiny 2.

it runs like diarrhea on Stadia. its just barely playable on Nvidia's offering, but its held back by high ping and general performance issues.

we're not going to replace our desktops in this decade.

besides, i dont like this new tech. i want to own my hardware and games, not rent it ffs.

Streaming service is the future, whether it is Movies, Tv series, Games, files, etc
 

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